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His Human Limitations
 

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Jesus Christ's Human Parentage, Human Limitations,
Human Relation to God, Human in all Things

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III.      Human Parentage

(1) Luke 2:7,  Acts 2:30, , Acts 13:23, Rom. 1:3, Gal. 4:4, Heb. 7:14
FIRST PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ had a human parentage and human ancestry. He was Mary’s son and David s seed.
Mary was as truly the mother of Jesus Christ as God was His Father.
IV.      Human Limitations
(1)      Physical Limitations
(a) John. 4:6
Jesus Christ was weary. Compare Is. 40:28
(b) Matt. 8:24
Jesus Christ slept. Compare Ps. 121:4, 5
(c) Matt. 21:18
Jesus Christ hungered.
(d) John 19:28
Jesus Christ thirsted.
(e) Luke 22:44
Jesus Christ suffered physical agony.
(f) 1 Cor. 15:3
Jesus Christ died.
FIRST PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was subject to weariness, hunger, thirst, agony and death—to the physical limitations of human nature.
(2)      Intellectual and Moral Limitations
(a) Luke 2:52, ESV
Jesus Christ advanced in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man. He was subject to human conditions of physical, mental and moral growth.
(b) Mark 11:13, 13:32
SECOND PROPOSITION: The knowledge of Jesus Christ was subject to limitations. (Compare Luke 2:52.)
Note 1.—His knowledge was self-limited. (Phil. 2:5, ESV “Emptied himself.” Must not press this verse too far. The context shows an emptying of glory rather than of attributes.)
Note 2.—John 3:34  As a teacher Jesus was divinely and fully inspired so that he spoke “the words of God.”
Note 3.—The indwelling Divine Nature often burst through the veil of flesh (see passages under Chapter I), but as a man he was a real man in his mental make-up.
(b) Heb. 4:15, Heb. 2:18 , (Compare Jas. 1:13)
THIRD PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was tempted. He was subject to the essential moral limitations of human nature.
Note 1.—A carnal nature is not an essential part of human nature. It does not belong to human nature as God made it. It is what has become part of human nature by sin.
Note 2.—Heb. 2:14,  Phil. 2:5–8
Jesus Christ in His moral limitations was self-limited. He voluntarily placed himself underneath the essential moral limitations that man is under in order to redeem man. Wondrous love!
Note 3.—He was tempted “without sin.”
GENERAL PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was subject to the intellectual and moral limitations essential to human nature.
(3)      Limitations of Power
(a) Mark 1:35,  John 6:15, Luke 22:41–45, Heb. 5:7
FIRST PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ prayed (25 times mentioned). He obtained power for work and for moral victory as other men do, by prayer. He was subject to human conditions for obtaining what He desired.
(b) Acts 10:38
SECOND PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ obtained power for His divine works not by His inherent Divinity but by the anointing of the Holy Spirit. He was subject to the same conditions of power as other men.
(b) John 14:12
THIRD PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was subject to limitations in the exercise of power during the days of His humiliation.
GENERAL PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was subject to human conditions for the obtaining of power and human limitations in its exercise. This was during the days of His humiliation.
IV.      Human Relation to God
John 20:17
FIRST PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ called the Father “My God.”
Jesus Christ bore the relation of man to God the Father.
V.      Human in All Things
Heb. 2:17, ESV
FIRST PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was made “in all things” like unto His brethren, subject to all the physical, mental and moral conditions of existence essential to human nature.
GENERAL PROPOSITION: Jesus Christ was in every respect a real man. He became so voluntarily to redeem man. (Phil. 2:5–8; 2 Cor. 8:9.) He partook of human nature that we might become partakers of the Divine nature. 2 Pet. 1:4—“Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises; that by these ye might be partakers of the Divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.”
Question: How shall we reconcile the Bible doctrine of the true Deity of Jesus Christ with the Bible doctrine of the real human nature of Christ?
 
Answer: That is not our main business. Our first business is to find out what the various passages mean in their natural grammatical interpretation. Then if we can reconcile them, well; if not, believe them both and leave the reconciliation to increasing knowledge. It is a thoroughly vicious principle of interpretation that we must interpret every passage in the Bible so that we can readily reconcile it with every other passage. This gives rise to a one-sided theology. One man becomes a one-sided Calvinist and another a one-sided Arminian, and so on through the whole gamut of doctrine. Our business is to find out the plainly intended sense of the passage in hand as determined by usage of words, grammatical construction and context. Remember that in many cases two truths that seemed utterly irreconcilable or perfectly contradictory to us once are now, with increased knowledge, seen to beautifully harmonize. Truths that still seem to us to be contradictory perfectly harmonize in the infinite wisdom of God, and will some day, when we approach more nearly to God’s omniscience, perfectly harmonize in the infinite wisdom of God, and will some day, when we approach more nearly to God’s omniscience, perfectly harmonize in our minds. How fearlessly the Bible puts the Deity and manhood of Jesus Christ in closest juxtaposition.
Matt. 8:24–26,  Luke 3:21, 22,  John. 11:38, 43, 44,  Luke 9:28, 29, 35, Matt. 16:16, 17, 21, Heb. 1:6, (Compare Heb. 2:18”), Heb. 4:14, 15
 

 

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